Are You A Museum Baby Boomer? Consider This: Leaving Well is the Best Revenge

cartoon strip

Dear museum baby boomers, this post is for you.

If you were born after 1964, this may confirm or support some of your worst fears, so you may want to give it a pass. Here at Leadership Matters we’re now in the chapter where some of our museum mentors are retired–taking cooking classes, exercising like fiends, traveling, reading novels–while others are beginning to announce their retirement dates. Or they are starting to do the work to make that happen: achieving the last, penultimate position, beefing up their consulting business, downsizing, buying the forever home. You know the drill.

Then there are the folks who should be planning their exit, but aren’t. The only decision they’ve made is to stay on as long as possible. They’re treading water, sucking up big(ger) salaries, and contributing in the most lacklustre fashion. They give the rest of us a bad name. Don’t get us wrong. We more than understand that the overall crappiness of museum salaries may mean working ’til age 70 isn’t a choice but a necessity. But, we firmly believe that employees should be judged by their contributions, never by their age, gender or race. And age and length of tenure don’t give you the right to coast–at least not until you’ve announced your exit date. In fact, no matter what your age, we hope you’re not coasting, but instead contributing your best self at work.

Study the colleagues you admire most, whether in the museum field or elsewhere. They are probably individuals who are constantly on a path of reinvention. They are probably not people hiding behind we’ve-always-done-it-that-way–or people who believe social media is the instrument of the devil. They’re the people who somehow link their institutional knowledge, which may be vast, to what’s going on the museum field, and always manage to say something new (and wise) in meetings. They are the people we all want to be when we get over our case of impostor syndrome.

So if you’re a boomer, we urge you to be a contributor ’til the day you pack up your office. Perhaps your museum or heritage organization has a succession plan in place. Whether it does–and they are excellent planning tools–you can have a personal succession plan as well. Just as you strategized your career when you were in your 30’s, 40’s or 50’s, a personal succession plan can help design your exit.

Don’t wait ’til you’re on your way to your retirement party to whine that no one picked your brain, and asked about that great store of knowledge you’ve amassed. Write it down. This actually applies to everyone. Commit work flow and basic tasks to a document. That way even if you have a skiing accident, your colleagues can step up and complete some basic tasks.

And if you are retiring, what information would someone need to do your job well on day one? How have your organization’s quirks informed the way you do things?  Were you a path-breaker in your position? Would you be willing to train your successor, and if the answer is yes, what might that look like? Perhaps the most important thing you need to strategize is what you’ll do when your days aren’t consumed with meetings, openings, and planning. Write that down too, but don’t share it. That’s for you and the rest of your life.

It’s summer. The days are long, and a lot of us are on vacation. If you will retire this year, commit to making the next 12 months the most fruitful ever. Go out with a bang.

Joan Baldwin


A Letter, Some Advice, and Reading for New Museum Leaders

napkins

In a week a friend and colleague of mine and Anne’s begins a new job. When all the papers were signed, and everything was real, she wrote to tell us the good news. Moving from a smaller organization to a much larger state-funded position, means she transitions from supervising a few to many.

Our friend and colleague is beginning a new chapter, and she isn’t alone. In the last year a number of our professional colleagues have gotten new jobs or new job titles. One thing distinguishes all these folks; not one thinks s/he has “arrived”. They are all learners. They read widely, observe carefully, and reflect. So while this annotated list is for them–you know who you are–we hope all our readers will find something they like.

For the Individual Leader/learner:

About the Business of Museums:

A Short list of books and Ted Talks for leaders:

Six Practices for Your First 100 Days from Leadership Matters:

  • Listen. Don’t wait for your turn to talk, listen.
  • Love what you do.
  • Participate before making decisions.
  • Model empathy and respect.
  • Practice reflection. Write, walk, meditate before or after work.
  • Identify your biases and work to leave them outside the office.

And, last, a poem from Mary Oliver:

The Summer Day

Who made the world?
Who made the swan, and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean-
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don't know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?

—Mary Oliver taken from https://www.loc.gov/poetry/180/133.html

Good luck,

Joan Baldwin & Anne Ackerson

 

 


Holiday Reading (& Listening)

a-woman-reading-a-bookDear friends, colleagues, readers and acquaintances,

Let’s face it, there is just too much information out there. Yes, some of us are seduced and beguiled by fake news or give up news altogether, but there is also a lot of really good writing going on. So if you’re taking time off before the new year and plan to devote yourself to self improvement of one kind or another, we recommend a cozy chair, a hot beverage, some great music, and one or more of the following.

Real books:

A Truck Full of Money by Tracy Kidder–If you’re a leader or a wanna be leader, pay particular attention to the early chapters where Paul English sets up his first company.

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates–A must read, particularly if you’re white, and deep in your lizard brain you think your beliefs and your unconscious biases aren’t aligned.

Articles and Short Reads:

42-Ways to Make Your Life Easier A little trite, but true. And you can download it.

Cleaning the Museum A voice from 1973 to remind us how important all our staffs are not just the ones with cool jobs.

Raising a Trail-Blazing Daughter Even if you’re not a parent, good advice from the notorious RBG.

Five Myths that Perpetuate Burn Out Across Nonprofits One of our favorites. We’ve written about this from the museum point of view, but this is better.

When It’s Dark Enough, You Can See the Stars is about the tenacity of nonprofit leaders. It’s about why we’re in this game even in the toughest of times.

How Far Should We Go In Building Leadership Qualities? To thine own self be true, baby.

Growing Bigger, Staying Collaborative – 5 Tools for Building Non-Bureaucratic Organizations  True to form, Nina Simon doesn’t hold back about sharing the good, the bad, and the ugly of her museum leadership journey.  This time it’s about facing and embracing organizational change.

The 5 Elements of a Strong Leadership Pipeline Thanks to the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network for the lead to this post which stresses organizational culture, learning through exposure, and knowledge sharing as key ingredients in movign

And to Listen to:

Just a Little Nicer If you’re not already a fan of NPR’s TED Radio Hour you should be. This is a good one to listen to as we look toward resolutions for 2017.

SNL’s Cold Open Hallelujah If your life is so busy the 8 million times this flashed on your screen you missed it, you need to adjust your life. Then you need to listen.


Reading for the New Year

snowy woods

Hello and happy New Year to one and all–

To help everyone begin 2015 on the right foot, here are some great reads and things to listen to:

http://www.npr.org/2014/12/19/371277215/is-it-enough-to-be-politically-correct

http://www.npr.org/2014/12/19/371686652/are-we-wired-to-be-compassionate

http://www.taramohr.com/10rules/

And to remind us all why we do what we do:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LM5xtk23cv0

And for those of us double XXers:

http://www.womensagenda.com.au/career-agenda/builders/nine-habits-to-develop-for-a-successful-2015/201412175061?utm_source=Women%27s+Agenda+List&utm_campaign=5bb3bb5ceb-Women_s_Agenda_daily_07_11_201402&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f3750bae8d-5bb3bb5ceb-30688241#.VJONDGTF-Cp

and last, but not least, this message from Kermit, which we should all take to heart:

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/kermit-the-frogs-note-to-self/

 

 


Leadership Isn’t Something You Leave at Work

Work Life Balance

One of the inspirations for our work was a book by Stewart Friedman. A professor at Wharton, Friedman wrote Total Leadership: Be a Better Leader, Have a Richer Life. While we loved his approach–that creating walls between work and home is a really bad idea–we weren’t at all sure how the 36 interviewees in our book,  Leadership Matters, would respond to questions about work/life balance. Yes, we’re a long way from Mad Men-style turmoil and drama at work that is supposed to magically evaporate (or not) on the commute home, but museum work, especially for those in leadership positions, can be all-consuming. Who knew whether today’s history museum leaders think about the need to be authentic at home and at work?

The answers were surprising. Everyone thought about it. And while responses varied depending on an interviewee’s age, whether they were in a committed relationship or parenting young children, the need to understand work’s ability to swallow a life is something all our interviewees struggle with. Some had to learn the hard way–having a relationship crumble–but many voiced a variety of solutions from turning off their cell phones, ceasing to talk about work at a certain point on the commute home, volunteering, and committing themselves to a variety of activities, hobbies, and worship.

By and large our interviewees are not lone rangers. Most have strong support networks comprised of family, mentors and friends on whom they depend. More than a few have standing dates with parents or other family members. Nathan Ritchie director of the Golden History Museum in Colorado commented wisely that “There is something to be said for making other things in life an obligation.” For the women we interviewed who are parents, work/life balance is more complex. For them, strong partnerships and support networks are paramount, but they are still frequently the primary care givers.

So, what are the take aways in the work/life balance? Being authentic matters–a lot: knowing who you are, understanding your own story and the integrity it breeds. Friedman suggests that leaders living solely for work shut off parts of who they are, leaving them less authentic and less creative, failing to meet challenges. Not all our interviewees balance work, community, family, and self perfectly, but what’s important is that no matter whether they lead from behind a big desk or from the middle of a department, they recognize the importance of the spheres in keeping their lives whole. We’ll leave the last comment to Colin Campbell, CEO of Colonial Williamsburg, who closed his interview by saying, “In the absence of a collaborative style, you’re going nowhere; going it alone is not an option.” Too true.