What the Deaccessioning Dilemma Says About Museum Leadership

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It’s been six months since the Berkshire Museum in Pittsfield, MA announced its New Vision , and then dropped the other shoe, telling the public that the cost of the new vision would be underwritten by selling 40 paintings from its collection. And for more than 182 days, the museum world has been in an uproar. If you played a word association game, and the words were Berkshire Museum, way too many of us would respond with “deaccessioning.”

We wrote about the  controversy months ago when it seemed the sale was imminent. Since last summer, deaccessioning’s become a new word, something parsed by journalists and art critics alike who tried to explain that even though the use of proceeds from deaccessioned items is not a law (except for New York State Education Department-chartered museums and historical societies) or even a rule, it’s a professional standard museums are expected to live by and with. And while Nina Simon may be correct, that use of proceeds from deaccessioning is an inflexible and antiquated standard, for those museums that are collecting institutions, it functions like the nuclear deterrent, holding big and small institutions in check, a necessary yet Faustian gamble that collecting institutions buy into. And here’s the logic behind that antiquated standard: Museums are non-profit organizations because they hold property (often collections) in the public trust. If those same collections can be monetized at the drop of a hat, where’s the trust?

As a museum, your non-profit status is, in part, secured by your organization’s willingness to stand behind your mission, and in doing so, make objects, art and the like available to all of us. So like Nina Simon, we believe  the Berkshire Museum controversy is not an issue solely about deaccessioning. It’s about leadership. Why? Because the Museum’s deaccessioning is a by-product of a series of decisions made by the board and director. It’s the story of a local, regional and national community who responded negatively, not only to the proposed sale, but also to the move toward a museum far more committed to science and technology than to art and the gentle “Window on the World” concept of its founder.

Granted, we only know what the Berkshire Museum has shared on its website, but when organizations anticipate change they examine the future like master chess players, thinking through as best as they are able, all the consequences of their actions. How did the the Museum’s 21-member board and its director get this so wrong, producing such a firestorm of antipathy?

If you read the Berkshire Museum’s timeline for its Master Planning Process, you discover that together with Hancock Shaker Village, it hired TDC, a Boston-based firm specializing in non-profit management three years ago. It was TDC’s 2015 report that stipulated “significant need for capitalization in order to provide sufficient endowment for the Berkshire Museum to support its operations.” (Side note: Among the eight principals on TDC’s website, not one has an arts background, much less a museum background.) And it was TDC who hired Experience Design out of Providence, RI, “to help identify scenarios for the Museum’s future and produce an interpretive plan for the scenario ultimately selected.” Again, we don’t know the real story, only what the Museum chooses to write, but based on its website, there is an odd distance between the Museum and its community. And neither the New Vision nor the Planning Process Timeline express much joy or love for the elegant Renaissance Revival building or its contents.

So what lessons can we learn from this as yet unfinished drama? Here are five thoughts for board members and directors to consider. We don’t know whether they apply in this situation, but we offer them nonetheless.

Being a board member–and some would argue being a museum director–is about service, collective work to safeguard, interpret, collections, ideas and living things for and with the public. Lesson 1: Know your institution. If the only places you know how to find at your museum are the board room and the restroom, you don’t know enough. Learn the campus. Find the furnace room. See collections storage. Know whether exhibit design is done on site or somewhere else. Know the staff by name. Know the important pieces, places, and their stories.

Remember in serving and protecting the institution, you serve your community which may be local, regional, national or international.  Lesson 2: Know your community. If you have questions about who participates at your museum, ask them. Remember, you need to know three things: Who your community is as a whole; who comes to your museum and most importantly who doesn’t. If you are considering a change, will it serve those who love your organization and make those who are indifferent into friends? If not, why not?

Don’t believe that an absence of affirmation means your community doesn’t care. To quote Joni Mitchel sometimes you don’t know what you’ve got ’till it’s gone. Lesson 3: Be a good communicator. Individually, but most importantly collectively, boards need to communicate clearly and well. If you’re on the board, and you don’t understand something, how will the public understand? Just because a board operates as a collective body doesn’t mean it can’t (and shouldn’t) engage in vigorous discussion around change.

Trust is something that’s earned. Lesson 4: Trust your community. To trust them, you have to know them. (See Lesson 2). That means if you hire consultants on a planning project, you have to provide them with every bit of knowledge you have, and let the chips fall where they may. It means if your hope to change your institution depends on the sale of much loved pieces, you need to say that.

And the last lesson? If you’re asked to serve on a board, believe in the institution that’s asking. Anything else is like buying a house you intend to tear down.

Tell us how your board faces the big decisions.

Joan Baldwin

 

 

 

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Perfectionism: Is It Part of Your Museum’s Culture?

Perfection

When you work in a highly competitive high school like I do, you have to think about perfectionism because daily you deal with students who truly can’t stop. They get too little sleep, and work compulsively.  Even their concept of recreation is sometimes a resume builder clad in another costume. And it’s peculiar how this culture of “never enough” seeps into the lives of adults in the community as well. As usual, that made me think about a) museums and b) the perfect being the enemy of the good.

In the for-profit world there are about a million books for people struggling with needing to be too perfect at work. But what about the museum world? Do we have issues with perfectionism? I suspect so.  Does the fact that so many museums are under-resourced leave staff and leadership reaching for perfection in attempt to save money? Is that because in a world where money is tight, there’s no room for the less than perfect? As a leader, have you figured out how to differentiate between mediocre big-concept ideas delivered in a tightly controlled way and looser more creative concepts that prompt more audience response?

To begin, let’s acknowledge that, irony of ironies, perfection is unattainable, and then remind ourselves that it’s not necessarily a good thing. And yet some days we don’t want it any less. How many of you grapple with experimenting versus completion? Do you put the brakes on new ideas because somehow it seems more important just to get the exhibit/program/event/fund raiser (you pick one) finished rather than try something new? Does that stifle staff creativity? If you said yes, know that you’re not alone. It’s hard to be flexible enough for idea-making and yet driven enough to complete the punch list.

One of the problems some perfectionist people and cultures experience is that they or the organization becomes overwhelmed by details. The weeds are never too high to keep them from wandering in and thrashing about. In a perfectionist culture this means that in a heart beat meetings go off track as staff try to solve problems that aren’t the main point. It’s like cooking a four-course meal before going to the grocery store, and as leaders, we have to be aware of what’s happening and gently steer the ship back on course.  In addition, in a perfectionist culture it is difficult to prioritize.  When everything has to be done perfectly, it’s hard to put a value on one task versus another.

Perfectionists also have problems delegating. They place the bar so high, that it’s unlikely anyone can fulfill even the most menial of tasks. Sometimes this leads to a “gotcha” backlash where in the spirit of no-amount-of-effort-is-enough, staff pick apart each other’s work, another moment where the watchful leader will gently counsel respect and understanding.

New research also shows that it is possible to be a perfectionist and not be neurotic, nor drive your colleagues crazy. According to this article from New York Magazine, healthy perfectionists are the folks who are likely to be happy with the results of their hard work versus their neurotic workmates who are never satisfied. If you’re interested in plotting your own levels of perfectionism, you can take this quiz included with the article.

There are many moments where we as leaders need to counterbalance perfectionism with the idea that it’s okay to let go and experiment. Success–even small victories–from experimentation rather than rigid adherence to rules breeds confidence and confidence breeds more success. To read more about this try Nina Simon’s blog, particularly this post. Or Creativity in Museum Practice by Linda Norris & Rainey Tisdale.

And as always, share your stories of success (and failure–that’s a different blog post!) with us here.

Joan Baldwin


Nina Simon and the Wisdom of the Crowd

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First we want to thank all of you interested in women’s issues for helping us break a record at the end of March. Four hundred and fifty people read our March 25 post. So for all of you interested in women and work, here are two links that may prove significant:

Amanda Hess’ article “Maybe It’s Time for Employers to Stop Being So Sexist When Women Ask for Raises”  (Slate.com, March 28, 2014)

Aine Creedon’s “Three Strategies for Women who Want Raises” (Nonprofit Quarterly, March 28, 2014)
And for those of you in possession of the double X chromosome remember, April 8 is the day we catch up with our male counterparts, so we hope you took your BFF out for a drink to celebrate.
So now, let’s talk about what being a visionary gets you. As many of you know, we divided the 36 leaders interviewed for Leadership Matters into four groups–self-aware, authentic, courageous and visionary. Not that each of our interviewees doesn’t possess all four characteristics in abundance, but dividing them allowed us to highlight how each is important in for leadership.

It’s no big surprise that the smallest group in our book is the visionaries. How many of you know a truly visionary leader? As we’ve said more than a few times on these pages, organizational vision is about possibilities, not about maintaining the status quo. If you want the same-old, same-old, then visionary leadership isn’t for you. Visionary leaders see not only possibilities, they articulate them in such real and compelling terms that their followers see them too. Once their dream is articulated, visionary leaders create pathways to make it real. These definitive, decisive steps are what set true visionary leaders apart from dreamers who never quite make their ideas come true.

We knew before Leadership Matters was even outlined that we wanted to interview Nina Simon. Nina–in case you’ve somehow missed her out-of-the-box career path–was once an unknown blogger, commenting on the museum world from the vastness of cyberspace. Today she’s the Executive Director of the Santa Cruz Museum of Art & History. And she’s a visionary. But interestingly, she’s a humble visionary. At some level, Nina’s leadership can be summed up by her need to check in with all of us–with her staff, with her community, and with her internet followers through her blog Museum 2.0.

Which brings me to NPR’s recent story, “So You Think You’re Smarter Than a CIA Agent,”. In the story, NPR’s Alix Spigel interviews a pharmacist named Elaine Rich who, along with 2,999 people is part of something called the Good Judgement Project. One of the points Spigel makes in describing the Good Judgement Project is that counterintuitively if you average a large number of predictions together, the errors cancel each other out and you end up with a more accurate guess. She adds that a large crowd of different people with access to different information who pool their predictions are in much better shape than a single very smart person, or even a small group of very smart people. There is a lesson here, one that Nina Simon got to before any of us.We could call it the lesson of not living in a vacuum; the lesson of not cooking up exhibits and programs deep inside the museum and then being surprised when the public doesn’t love them. In the museum world, Simon figured this out a long time ago. Even before she became a director, she was all about the wisdom of the crowd.

Unlike the Good Judgement Project, Simon is not trying to predict whether North Korea will test another missile. Instead, she is interested in how participation–whether by community, artist, staff or individual–changes things. But here’s the dicey bit, and maybe it’s what makes Simon a visionary. Not only was she among the first to bring the wisdom of the crowd into her museum, she’s comfortable with it. And maybe that’s something all proto-leaders need to ponder. When you ask the crowd what it thinks, you have to be prepared to live with the answer even if it changes things fundamentally. There is a pay off though. The crowd is right there with you. It sees Simon’s museum as its own because she constantly asks for thoughts and opinions. And she (and her staff) are prepared for instability and change based on what folks say they want.

Not all of us are visionaries. And that’s probably a good thing. But as you think about leadership, think about your willingness to trust the crowd, to change mid-stream, to adapt. That’s the Simon lesson and it’s part of great leadership.