Job Offer? Use the Moment.

Two-men-needing-jobs

This week, along with five colleagues, I helped run a discussion about pay at the New England Museum Association’s 100th anniversary meeting in Stamford, CT. The meeting opened at the same time as newly-unionized hotel workers staged a picket line as part of their ongoing wage negotiations. As a result, our session was one of many that left the Hilton in solidarity with the hotel workers, holding our discussion across the drive in a small park.

It was the first day that felt like fall, but bright and beautiful. Attendees gathered in groups to discuss issues around unpaid internships, emerging professional pay, gender and pay, diversity and pay, and salary negotiations. Towards the end, groups reported out on their top thoughts. Ultimately those will make their way to NEMA in the hopes they will continue to spur action toward raising the field’s salaries.

One thing that struck me listening to the report-outs was how important negotiation or at least human interaction is in launching or continuing a job successfully. Ilene Frank, COO of CT Historical Society, and Diane Jellerette, Director of the Norwalk Historical Society, both commented afterwards how few people seem to know their own worth when an offer is on the table. Too many view that moment as if there is still a line outside the door of equally qualified people all clamoring for the position. “They don’t understand, we don’t want our second choice,” Frank said. “And they don’t understand their power,” Jellerette added.

Their point? Too few, and particularly too few women, understand the power job applicants possess when the offer is on the table. Job searches are time sponges. Work is neglected. Money is spent. Teams–and sometimes boards of trustees– assembled and focused. After a process that can last weeks and occasionally months, no one wants a no. As an applicant, you weren’t chosen as one of many, you were chosen because you were the best for this position. USE THE MOMENT. It is potent.

In fact, the way you negotiate your offer sets a template for your future. Your salary and benefits recalibrate from whatever you and your new employers decide. Years from now your retirement package will be determined by how you behave in this moment. So…no pressure, but DON’T LEAVE MONEY ON THE TABLE. If you’re in the job search process, particularly if you’re new to the museum world, here are some things to think about when someone picks you for what hopefully is your dream job.

  1. Be grateful. You aren’t the only ones who’ve been through a lot to make this happen, and these folks picked you. Say thank-you.
  2. Ask to think about it. The little person in your head may be doing your happy dance, but you’re in the sweet spot. Press pause.
  3. Go home. Talk to the people who matter to you. Look at your budget. Calculate your expenses. Can you live in this town/city/region on what they’ve offered? If you don’t know, find out how much that costs.
  4. DO YOUR DUE DILIGENCE. Know what the field is paying. AAM, along with many of the regional museum and statewide nonprofit associations, do salary surveys. Find them and use them. And for goodness sake, if you’re in a field like development or IT that moves across the non-profit world, know what organizations outside museums pay.
  5. Some of us are epically bad at math. Because your offer also includes monies dedicated to state and federal programs and taxes, use sites like this to calculate your net take-home pay.
  6. If you haven’t already asked, read the Employee Handbook. Know what working in this particular place will mean to you. If you have an elderly relative you care for, if you’re planning a family, if your partner works long hours, these questions are all part of the calculus. Does it offer paid leave or only FMLA? Things you wouldn’t have mentioned during the interview like you have a toddler and day care is $100/day are now fair game as you decide what you need.
  7. Time is also money. What if your new employer offers full benefits at 35 hours/week? Your offer is 40 hours/week, but you have two kids in kindergarten and first grade. Can you negotiate for fewer hours? Yes.
  8. Ask for assistance with moving. What if you don’t know a soul where you’re moving and you literally can’t afford movers? Ask. A $2,000 or $3,000 one-time expense is better than losing a great candidate.
  9. Ask for time. Do you need time off before you start to clear your head and settle your family? Ask.
  10. Know your own value relative to the field. Are you the second coming when it comes to exhibit design or conservation? Do others call you with questions? Is the reason you’re job shopping because you know you’re worth more? Well then, don’t throw it away. Use it.

Joan Baldwin

Image: Molly Brown House Museum

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